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Assessment Criteria#

1. Project management and documentation#

Learning outcomes

  • Learn the process and tools used to document course work
  • Acquire the necessary skills to publish projects, documentation and share the results of each assignment

Student checklist

  • Build a documentation website describing me and my motivation for the textile-academy, including my previous work
  • Upload the documentation to my project page on class.textile-academy.org
  • Add references and research based on the topic of your interest
  • Learn how to upload images, videos, references and how to use Markdown and Gitlab
  • Customize your website and document how you did it (extra credit)

2. Digital Bodies#

Learning outcomes

  • References - Concept
  • Design: 3D scanning , 3D file manipulation, mesh repair tools, explore 3D programs (open and closed sourced)
  • Fabrication: Capable of executing from file to production workflow, from slicer to laser cutting
  • Documentation: Anyone can go through the process and understand the project
  • Final outcome: Is the project assembled, functioning and complete
  • Originality - Aesthetics: Has the design been thought through and elaborated

Student checklist

  • Include some inspiration: research on artists or projects that work with the human body
  • Document the use of 3D scanner and software to acquire a 3D model
  • Document the process of repairing and/or manipulating a 3D mesh and slicing it.
  • Create my ready to cut file for laser cutting, learn how to use the laser cutter and document the workflow and upload your 3D and 2D files
  • Learn about the fab lab processes, booking system, usage, machine demos, tools and safety rules
  • Build and/or assemble my mannequin, create a stop motion assembling it or stepped process
  • Send one picture (HIGH RES) of my mannequin to enter the competition for the annual exhibition (extra credit)

3. Circular Open Source Fashion#

Learning outcomes

  • References and Concept development
  • Design: sketches, prototypes, material choices, tests, 2D vector design software
  • Fabrication: laser cutting, workflow, assemblying, material used and leftovers
  • Documentation: Anyone can go through the process and understand it
  • Final outcome: Is the project assembled, functioning and complete
  • Originality - Aesthetics: Has the design been thought through and elaborated

Student checklist

  • Design and prototype with paper and scissors modular configurations and locking connections. Document the paper prototypes
  • Run tests of laser cutting of your designs in fabric and document the parameters for the chosen fabric.
  • Design and Document the process.
  • Laser cut the modules. Create a modular or seamless garment, showing that the connection is well-designed and holds the pull/stretch of a garment. Document the assembly process and tests.
  • Upload the open source file in pdf, in correct scale with 1-5 pictures at (https://oscircularfashion.com) (preferably in white background)
  • Submit some of the modules to the analog or digital material library of the lab. Recommended size 20cm *20cm. (extra credit)

4. Biofabricating dyes & materials#

Learning outcomes

  • Master techniques for natural dyeing or bacterial dyeing
  • Master techniques for growing or crafting personalised materials
  • Documentation: Anyone can go through the process and use the recipes
  • Final outcome: create a material or color chart
  • Originality - Aesthetics: Has the design been thought through and elaborated

Student checklist

  • Produce at least one natural dye or bacterial dye.
  1. Natural dye - modifying it’s colour and mordanting it in different ways to dye at least 2 different categories of fibers
  2. Bacterial dye - Explored dyeing with bacteria of different fibers and/or bacteria
  • Produce at least one crafted or grown material
  1. Crafted material - explore the different recipes and understand how to adjust them based on the ingredients
  2. Grown material - explore the different recipes and understand how to adjust them based on the ingredients
  • Document your recipes, the ingredients and process and if there have been changes, document your unexpected discoveries
  • Name your materials, classify them by typology and display them in a systematic order of samples.
  • Submit some of your swatches to the analog material library of your lab. (20cm*20cm approx)

5. Wearables I#

Learning outcomes

  • Understand how we can produce soft circuits, sensors and actuators
  • Learn how to embed them in garments, soft objects or wearables
  • Study and learn soft-hard connections
  • Discover necessary materials, components, tools
  • Explore and replicate existing projects

Student checklist

  • Build at least one digital and one analogue soft sensors, using different materials and techniques.
  • Document the sensor project as well as the readings got using the AnalogRead of Arduino
  • Integrate the two soft sensors into one or two textile swatches using hard soft connections
  • Document the circuit and it’s schematic
  • Document your swatches
  • Upload a small video of the swatches functioning
  • Integrate the swatch into a project (extra credit)

6. Computational Couture#

Learning outcomes

  • References: tutorial, links, inspiration
  • Design: sketch, 3D modeling skills, Parametric modeling skills
  • Fabrication: Capable of executing from file to production workflow, from 3D modelling to 3D printing, parameters, materials
  • Documentation: Anyone can go through the process and understand it
  • Final outcome: Is the project assembled, functioning and complete
  • Originality - Aesthetics: Has the design been thought through and elaborated

Student checklist

  • Document the concept, sketches, references also to artistic and scientific publications
  • Design a parametric model using Grasshopper3D and uploadthe rhino file + grasshopper files.
  • Learn how to use 3D printing techniques to print the 3D model in/on the chosen materials.
  • Document the workflow for exporting your file and preparing the machine and gcode to be 3D printed
  • Upload your stl file with pictures at: https://oscircularfashion.com
  • Submit some of your swatches to the analog material library of your lab. Size 20cm*20cm approx. (extra credit)

FAQ

Q. Is it mandatory to use Grasshopper3D

A. As this is one of the standard tools, that have created a large community of users and libraries around it, it is strongly recommended to try this software. But other parametric packages such as Autodesk Dynamo / Revit are acceptable.

7. The Textile Scaffold#

Learning outcomes

  • References: tutorial, links, inspiration
  • Design: Sketch, 3D modeling skills, Parametric modeling skills
  • Fabrication: Capable of executing from file to production workflow, from 3D modelling to 3D printing, parameters, materials
  • Documentation: Anyone can go through the process and understand it
  • Final outcome: is the project assembled, functioning and complete
  • Originality - Aesthetics: Has the design been thought through and elaborated

Student checklist

  • Document the concept, 3D model of the piece and document the design process
  • Make two samples with 2 out of the 5 techniques to make a prototype of a textile form: fabric formwork with casting, crystalization, wood-textile, resin-textile, leather molding or other
  • Document the process from CAD to CAM, document how to use the CNC mill and prototype your textile composite
  • Upload your 3D model and CAM file
  • Document the 2 processes you have followed side by side from design to machine and hands-on making, materials you used, your mistakes, failures and achievements
  • Use 3D modeling software to simulate your fabric deformation (extra credit)

8. OPEN SOURCE HARDWARE from fibers to fabrics#

Learning outcomes

  • References: tutorial , links, inspiration
  • Design: sketch, 3D modeling skills, Parametric modeling skills
  • Fabrication: Capable of executing from file to production workflow, from 3D modelling to digital fabrication, parameters, materials
  • Documentation: Anyone can go through the process and understand it
  • Final outcome : Is the project assembled, functioning and complete
  • Originality - Aesthetics: Has the design been thought through and elaborated

Student checklist

  • Research and document existing fabrication methods, machines and industries, add references and sketches of the machine and the chosen process
  • Design and document the files of the machine, machine hack or tool and fabrication - assembly process
  • Document the schematic and the software source code (if any)
  • Document the parts and how to make your tool or machine
  • Bill of materials: electronics, materials amount other (references of the components)
  • Design, create and document a final outcome, a sample project of your process
  • Make a small video of the machine
  • Create an interface for controling your machine (extra credit)

9. Wearables II#

Learning outcomes

  • References: tutorial , links, inspiration.
  • Design: program a microcontroller, design circuit and schematic
  • Fabrication: Integrate inputs and outputs in a microcontroller project
  • Documentation: Anyone can go through the process and understand
  • Final outcome: Is the project assembled, functioning and complete
  • Originality - Aesthetics : Has the design been thought through and elaborated

Student checklist

  • Document the concept, sketches, references also to artistic and scientific publications
  • Create a swatch using an ATTiny with one input and one output, using hard-soft connection solutions and battery
  • Create 2 actuator swatches. Test them with the Arduino or ATTiny.
  • Learn how to program and ATTiny, add the libraries and links used for the code.
  • Document the schematic and the programming code, the libraries added and the power requirements.
  • Upload a small video of your object working.
  • Integrate it to a project.

10. Implications and applications#

Learning outcomes

  • References: links, inspiration
  • Design: concept and service model
  • Documentation: Stakeholders analysis, Service description, Personalisation options
  • Final outcome: Is the product - service completely defined and ready to be presented to potential stakeholders

Student checklist

  • Document the concept, sketches, references also to artistic and scientific publications
  • Create an Ultra-personalised product service systems (UPPSS) for your final project
  • Map the potential stakeholders
  • Explore personalisation at all the different levels
  • Interview your potential users/ target group about your concept, quantify results (extra credit)

11. Soft Robotics#

Learning outcomes

  • References: tutorials, links, inspiration
  • Design: Sketch, 2D and 3D modeling, Parametric modeling and electronic skills, simulation
  • Fabrication: Capable of executing from file to production workflow, molding and casting, vinylcutting, laser cutting
  • Documentation: Anyone can go through the process and understand it
  • Final outcome: Is the project assembled, functioning and complete
  • Originality - Aesthetics: Has the design been thought through and elaborated

Student checklist

  • Document the concept, sketches, references also to artistic and scientific publications
  • Make a soft robotic sample, develop the pattern for the Inflatable and draw a sketch of the air flow
  • Build a pneumatic wrist brace (basic level) or
  • Build a Soft Gripper (intermediate level) or
  • Build and document a Pneumatic, digitally controlled system , electronics schematic, electronic control and code (advanced level)
  • Experiment with different materials, such as silicones, 3d printing, parchment paper, thermoadesive vynil, bioplastic , document your achievements and unexpected outcomes
  • Upload a small video of your inflatable working
  • Integrate it into a project (extra credit)

12. Skin Electronics#

Learning outcomes

  • Understand how to implement electronics close to the body as an interface
  • Learn how to embed electronics into the body, creating a second skin

Student checklist

  • Document the concept, sketches, references also to artistic and scientific publications
  • Design a skin circuit: Build your own version of the Skin masquerade party project or Build your own version of the Twinkle Nails project
  • Document the project and included all source files, and all materials used
  • Make a video with your skin electronic working
  • Make a performance of your project functioning (extra credit)

13. Final Project planning and pitch#

Plan and present your final project idea.

Learning outcomes

  • References: concept development, research, where does the project innovate
  • Design: sketch, 2D and 3D modeling, Parametric modeling and electronic skills, schematics, power requirements
  • Fabrication: overview of workflow for the machines required
  • Documentation: Anyone can go through the process and understand it
  • Final outcome: two minutes project presentation
  • Originality - Aesthetics: Has the design and innovation been thought through and elaborated

Student checklist

  • Document the concept, sketches, references also to artistic and scientific publications
  • Create a GANTT chart (planning calendar)
  • List and (if possible) cost of all foreseen materials required
  • List and calendar planning of machines required
  • Create a quick prototype of it. (physical, digital, collage or render )
  • Make a video pitch of your project (extra credit)

Final Project#

Your project is required to use at least 3 out of the 12 assignments, or advance the state of the art by presenting innovation that was not presented in class

Learning outcomes

  • Story telling: is the project clearly communicated and well presented
  • Project management: tasks identified and programmed during project development
  • Design, Prototyping and development
  • Documentation: extensive documentation of design, processes and workflow
  • Final outcome: two minutes project presentation
  • Originality - Aesthetics: Has the design and innovation been thought through and elaborated
  • Dissemination: presentation and video material

Student checklist

  • MID term presentation - pitch presentation
  • FINAL presentation - pitch presentation
  • Report of workflow - planning, machines, processes, materials
  • Report of Process: Design, Prototyping and development
  • Working Prototype
  • Final Project Video

FAQ

Q: Is a final project acceptable if it is only based one or two classes of the course?

A: Yes, but in this case the project must be a relevant and original contribution to the field, and the depth of the work should clearly be much more than a regular assignment for that week.

Q: Is it possible to develop a group final project

A: Yes, but the individual student contribution should cover all the phases of the project and be clearly identified in the documentation. In any case it is recommended that each of the student develops a module of the project, starting from the concept to the actual realisation.